March 1921
  • The first show that has now become Skule Nite premieres. It was originally entitled “Ngynyrs in SPaSms”, and performed at Massey Hall.
  • The show contained 11 sketches, and was accompanied by a student band called the “Toike Oikestra”.
1923
  • The show moves to Hart House.
  • It takes on a new format, containing a variety of theatrical reviews and displays, competitions and dancing.
1940s
  • The show was referred to as the “Revue” up until this point. It now becomes Skule Nite.
  • Skule Nite evolves into the extravagant evening of theatre that it is mostly known for today.
  • Skule Nite is moved to the fall in order to allow for a full year of production.
1942
  • Skule Nite is cancelled due to World War II.
1944
  • Skule Nite is displaced to the Royal Ontario Museum due to World War II.
1965
  • Skule Nite’s attendance begins to drop off.
1968
  • EngSoc decides to put on a Broadway musical in place of Skule Nite, titled “Stop the World, I Want to Get Off”. It does poorly, leaving them in debt from production costs. This results in the cancellation of Skule Nite for the foreseeable future.
1973
  • For the 100th anniversary of the Faculty, and the 50th anniversary of Skule Nite, an Industrial Engineering student named Michael Stanek decides to put on a one-time-only Skule Nite show this year.
  • It does so well that the show continues to run for every year thereafter.
1977
  • Skule Nite opens on a Wednesday evening in March, as it had been for years. That night, the Stanford Fleming fire occurs. The students are lucky to have moved all of their set pieces only the day before.
  • Auditions and rehearsals are held in the Old Metro Library building, the abandoned/condemned theatre, and the Robert Gill Theatre until Sanford Fleming is repaired and opened back up from the fire.
1981
  • Up until this year, the Hart House theatre curtains were a gold colour, and referred to as the “golds” as a result. During this year’s show, two students prank a cast member by spraying whipped cream onto his face. Unfortunately, the whipped cream sprays onto the golds too, causing them to need to be replaced for a hefty cost. The curtains are replaced with the rust-coloured curtains, therein referred to as “rusts”.
2000s
  • Skule Nite production becomes a 4-day, 5-show format. The show is put on in the 2nd/3rd week of March, premiering on a Wednesday evening, and re-running on the subsequent Thursday, Friday and Saturday (with 2 Saturday shows.)
2012
  • Skule Nite upgrades its tech stack from hand-held microphones to wireless headsets. This allows for all of cast to be mic’d during numbers, as opposed to having only 8 cast who could previously be mic’d, while the rest sang loudly, hoping the audience would hear.
2013
  • Skule Nite invests in new, larger scaffolding for the set design. This allows for the performances to be brought much further down stage, and opens up new opportunities for bigger and better tech pieces to be featured in each year's show. This scaffolding is still used today.
2018
  • History repeats itself when glow-in-the-dark paint from a cast member’s costume splatters onto the Hart House Theatre curtains (“rusts”), necessitating another costly replacement. This time, the colour of the rusts doesn’t change.
2020
  • Skule Nite is cut short due to the initial lockdowns for Covid-19. Only the Wednesday premier and Thursday show are allowed to run. The Thursday show runs with a delayed start time of almost 1 hour, allowing for members of the team to go up on stage and perform various musical acts to entertain the audience while friends and family rush to the theatre to catch the last run.
2021
  • UofT moves to online-learning, Hart House theatre closes its doors for the year and Skule Nite is forced to move away from live theatre format due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. In response to the inability to perform in person, Skule Nite decides to film and release an online movie version of the show.
March 1921
  • The first show that has now become Skule Nite premieres. It was originally entitled “Ngynyrs in SPaSms”, and performed at Massey Hall.
  • The show contained 11 sketches, and was accompanied by a student band called the “Toike Oikestra”.
1923
  • The show moves to Hart House.
  • It takes on a new format, containing a variety of theatrical reviews and displays, competitions and dancing.
1940s
  • The show was referred to as the “Revue” up until this point. It now becomes Skule Nite.
  • Skule Nite evolves into the extravagant evening of theatre that it is mostly known for today.
  • Skule Nite is moved to the fall in order to allow for a full year of production.
1942
  • Skule Nite is cancelled due to World War II.
1944
  • Skule Nite is displaced to the Royal Ontario Museum due to World War II.
1965
  • Skule Nite’s attendance begins to drop off.
1968
  • EngSoc decides to put on a Broadway musical in place of Skule Nite, titled “Stop the World, I Want to Get Off”. It does poorly, leaving them in debt from production costs. This results in the cancellation of Skule Nite for the foreseeable future.
1973
  • For the 100th anniversary of the Faculty, and the 50th anniversary of Skule Nite, an Industrial Engineering student named Michael Stanek decides to put on a one-time-only Skule Nite show this year.
  • It does so well that the show continues to run for every year thereafter.
1977
  • Skule Nite opens on a Wednesday evening in March, as it had been for years. That night, the Stanford Fleming fire occurs. The students are lucky to have moved all of their set pieces only the day before.
  • Auditions and rehearsals are held in the Old Metro Library building, the abandoned/condemned theatre, and the Robert Gill Theatre until Sanford Fleming is repaired and opened back up from the fire.
1981
  • Up until this year, the Hart House theatre curtains were a gold colour, and referred to as the “golds” as a result. During this year’s show, two students prank a cast member by spraying whipped cream onto his face. Unfortunately, the whipped cream sprays onto the golds too, causing them to need to be replaced for a hefty cost. The curtains are replaced with the rust-coloured curtains, therein referred to as “rusts”.
2000s
  • Skule Nite production becomes a 4-day, 5-show format. The show is put on in the 2nd/3rd week of March, premiering on a Wednesday evening, and re-running on the subsequent Thursday, Friday and Saturday (with 2 Saturday shows.)
2012
  • Skule Nite upgrades its tech stack from hand-held microphones to wireless headsets. This allows for all of cast to be mic’d during numbers, as opposed to having only 8 cast who could previously be mic’d, while the rest sang loudly, hoping the audience would hear.
2013
  • Skule Nite invests in new, larger scaffolding for the set design. This allows for the performances to be brought much further down stage, and opens up new opportunities for bigger and better tech pieces to be featured in each year's show. This scaffolding is still used today.
2018
  • History repeats itself when glow-in-the-dark paint from a cast member’s costume splatters onto the Hart House Theatre curtains (“rusts”), necessitating another costly replacement. This time, the colour of the rusts doesn’t change.
2020
  • Skule Nite is cut short due to the initial lockdowns for Covid-19. Only the Wednesday premier and Thursday show are allowed to run. The Thursday show runs with a delayed start time of almost 1 hour, allowing for members of the team to go up on stage and perform various musical acts to entertain the audience while friends and family rush to the theatre to catch the last run.
2021
  • UofT moves to online-learning, Hart House theatre closes its doors for the year and Skule Nite is forced to move away from live theatre format due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. In response to the inability to perform in person, Skule Nite decides to film and release an online movie version of the show.